Were motives european exploration 15th and 16th centuries

One factor was the desire to find a shorter route to Asia. The Europeans were trading with Asia, and the land route to Asia was a difficult and dangerous route to travel. The Europeans hoped they might find quicker routes to Asia, either by going around Africa, as Vasco da Gama did, or by heading west, as Christopher Columbus did.

Were motives european exploration 15th and 16th centuries

European conquest of the New World was motivated by European nation-states' need to gain increasingly scarce resources, compounded by rivalry between nations. By the 15th and 16th centuries, European resources were depleting.

Each nation-state looked aggressively for new land, and explorers discovering new terrain took possession in the name of the sponsoring nation. Discovery of new land was followed by rapid and aggressive attempts at colonization.

The Need for Timber Fifteenth and 16th European nations relied on their sailing ships for exploration Europe was rebounding from the plague, with populations and commerce rebuilding.

Sailing ships acted as the primary vehicles that transported goods and commodities. After centuries of deforestation, the availability of large timbers required not only for ships, but also for new buildings was limited.

Finding abundant resources of mature timber for building ships and housing was a critical need for all European nation-states. The New World offered an abundance of large timber, making it an appealing source of lumber.

The search for precious metals -- especially gold -- drove expeditions in the 15th and 16th century. Gold artifacts and precious metals funded the expensive process of colonization, with explorers searching aggressively for precious metals.

Some of this search was fueled by exploits of early explorers. InSpanish explorer and military leader Hernan Cortez, legendary for his search for gold, led Spanish troops to the Aztec empire in Mexico. Upon arriving in Mexico's capital city, Cortez received substantial gifts of gold from the Aztec leader.

The Aztecs intended the gold to placate the European visitors, but their gifts had the opposite effect. Ultimately, the Aztec capital, known today as Mexico City, was besieged by Cortez, who claimed it -- and its gold -- for Spain in August of Human Capital Enslaved Aztecs built a new city for the Spanish on the ruins of their old capital.

In addition to natural resources, conquered territories supplied human capital, most frequently in the form of slavery.

Cortez's conquest of Mexico meant not only control of natural resources, but also enslavement of the peoples of Mexico, who were required to work as agricultural laborers, builders and miners.

Were motives european exploration 15th and 16th centuries

During the process of European colonization, this process of enslavement and control was repeated throughout the New World. Indigenous peoples were enslaved and set to work producing commodities for export to the Old World.

Impacts of 15th- and 16th-Century Advances on Exploration and Trade by Nicholas Chechak on Prezi

Personal Ego European monarchs valued both tangible and intangible symbols of wealth. Rivalry between European monarchs also drove competition in finding lands to be claimed for the glory of the nation -- and for the glory of the monarch. Most royal families were distantly related through the centuries-old tradition of marriage to create alliances, and being the best or wealthiest in terms of resources and achievement drove many monarchs to pay explorers, such as Christopher Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci, to find new territory for expansion.

More land and more resources equated to higher status and more prestige -- and personal glory.Nov 20,  · Europeans didn't suddenly start exploring just because they could; there were many motives that led to European exploration and expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries.

Were motives european exploration 15th and 16th centuries

They made people confront the dangerous journey to the new colonies, a journey which killed about one half of the people who tried srmvision.com: Open. European expansion in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries were led by the three main motives of God, glory, and gold.

Books such as "Travels of John Mandeville" and "Travels" by Marco Polo inspired explorers in the centuries to come. There were several factors that led to European exploration in the 15th century. One factor was the desire to find a shorter route to Asia.

The Europeans were trading with Asia, and the land route.

Nov 20,  · Europeans didn't suddenly start exploring just because they could; there were many motives that led to European exploration and expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries. They made people confront the dangerous journey to the new colonies, a journey which killed about one half of the people who tried srmvision.com: Open. European exploration, exploration of regions of Earth for scientific, commercial, religious, military, and other purposes by Europeans, beginning about the 4th century bce. The motives that spur human beings to examine their environment are many. European expansion in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries were led by the three main motives of God, glory, and gold. Books such as "Travels of John Mandeville" and "Travels" by Marco Polo inspired explorers in the centuries to come.

What were some of the causes of European exploration and expansion? (5) Spread religion (crusading mentality), Search for an alternate trade route to indies, to have powerful nation states, ship/sail design and navigation equipment, and the renaissance- individualism, optimism, and a sense of adventure.

The European Voyages of Exploration: Introduction The effects of exploration were not only felt abroad would change very slowly throughout the early centuries of European exploration.

By the sixteenth century, European maps started to expand their depictions and. Europeans didn't suddenly start exploring just because they could; there were many motives that led to European exploration and expansion in the 15th and 16th centuries.

European exploration - The Age of Discovery | srmvision.com